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how do you have your tea?(or other hot beverage)

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I just had milk tea for lunch. It's vanilla based milk tea. Not sure what other components are included, but it keeps me from falling asleep. I'd prefer this over coffee any time.

I'm surprised that it is only available in your Chinatown. Hasn't the milk tea craze penetrated the mass market yet? In Taiwan, milk tea is big. Even their local brand, Quickly, managed to setup shop in our country. Maybe it might be a good business venture over there to put up a milk tea shop.

As for hosting images, I personally prefer photobucket. All of the image I post in this board is hosted in photobucket.

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Perhaps some Chinese restaurants may have Bubble Tea...but I haven't noticed it on some of their menu's as of yet :/ I think some do alcoholic cocktails with the tapioca pearls...but again, I only saw that in Chinatown...

I have been wanting to open up a Maid Cafe/Tea House in these parts, but I wonder if being served tea and desserts by a person in a maid/waiter outfit would be a little weird...

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I think it would work. Nevermind the novelty of the cafe, as long as the beverage and food is good, customer will continue to patronize it. Do you have any tea houses over there? If you do, then I think it is definitely worth a try. Since the UK has tea as a staple drink, I think a tea house would be a welcome market if it isn't already available. Move over starbucks, here come Maid Cafe!

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you need to remember that in the UK, milk tea is the norm.

that is, tea with about 10-30% milk.

cafe's are very normal, there are numerous in each town.

and cafe's serve tea, coffee, juice and assorted sandwiches, soup and other snack foods.

a milk tea bar type place would be difficult to market in the uk due to people's tendency to already put milk in tea. to try and explain this to people is like saying tea with more milk in it. people just wouldn't get it unless you give them a presentation. and then if you did say that to people, they would just go to their normal cafe and ask for more milk. which people could do anyway in the past on their own initiative but they don't because then it is cold and tasteless. everyone has their own favourite way of having their tea, with their preferred amount of milk.

bubble tea.. sounds like milkshake to me. I'm not sure, it might get some interest if it was tried in some cafe's.

but then again, a lot of british are creatures of habit.

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You see, that's just it. Milk tea is not your regular cup of tea. I know what tea tastes like when you mix milk with it, and milk tea, or bubble tea, does not taste like that. It's taste is actually closer to sweet coffee, but without the bitterness. Of course it depends on what kind of flavor you want for your milk tea. But I guess you are right about the british being creatures of habit. I mean, just the other day, it was the second time that I heard a british company requiring their call centers to speak with a british accent. Though I'm not sure if I should call that habit or just being pompous.

Am I correct to pressume that tea in the UK is consumed hot? Milk tea is consumed cold. Do pardon my advocacy for Milk Tea. I really do enjoy the occasional drink with its rich and aromatic flavors, and would like to share my new found habit. Perhaps should chance permit, you might want to partake in trying it.

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Ryuki, British Milk Tea is not the same as this Milk/Bubble Tea - you have to try it to understand the difference :/ Just like how British Milk Tea is not the same as Indian Milk Tea/Chai. The main difference is in the preparation.

Also, it's not fair to say that only the British are creatures of habit - everyone is, which is why you need a USP to capture their interest. Don't underestimate people's capacity to try new things - sure there'll be naysayers, but I think despite people's tendency to be rigid, there are more people looking for something to spark their imagination - to add zest in an otherwise grey world.

Durendal, usually, yes. Tea in the UK is consumed hot/warm - fresh out of the pot (just like coffee). Though, when I ordered my Bubble Tea I was given the choice to have it either hot or cold...my friend suggested cold and I went for it. I think next time I'll try it hot and report the difference, but I'll also have a cold one to make the test fair :P

Though, having given up coffee...what I really miss is the variety in preparation of coffee - you walk into a cafe and you can order Frappe's; Cappuccino's; Latte's; Mocha's; Espresso's...etc. My favourite was the Frappe - cold Milk Coffee! When you look at the list of teas, it's either fruit/herbal infusions or the classics Earl Grey; Darjeeling; Ceylon etc. Nothing different about its preparation, just standard hot water and milk...so you can understand why I'm so happy about Bubble Tea - cold Milk Tea and it tastes good! Not to mention healthier (to those who care) - more milk and less caffeine, so I suppose there would be a market for this.

In regards to the Tea House question...we sort of do, though you can drink tea anywhere - cafe's; hotels; pubs; most restaurants...which is why I think it may be odd/difficult to open a place that only serves varieties of tea and desserts. Though, no-one ever got anywhere without taking a few risks...and I might be inclined to make this one.

Edited by ErutanXiku

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Opening a tea house does not neccessarilly mean that you are only serving drinks. A different thing that you can actually offer is the Lifestyle. Don't promote the drink, but promote it's benefits and its way of life. Opening a business is always a risk. But it's still something that you can manage, given the right skills and knowledge.

Similar to Starbucks, they're not only serving you coffee, they are serving you the prestige. Or rather, that's how it is presented here.

I just thought up of a good business proposal. Maybe there's a market for "International Tea House". A bar that serves not only the herbal tea variety, but specialty teas from other regions as well, like Chai, Bubble Tea, and Teh Tarik. I'm sure there are a lot of variations out there.

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Lol, that's kind of what I always planned to do - open a place that sold Tea from everywhere and all the interesting preparations I could find. Though, I think I'd draw the line at anything similar to that 'Luxury Coffee' that comes from feline poop. I think the misconception is that Tea is boring, when it used to symbolise exotic lands.

I gave up coffee and turned to tea for the health benefits - I've lived (am living) the lifestyle I'm planning to sell, I suppose :/ As for the image, I want it to be unique but kind of quirky, hence the choice in uniform I have in mind, but I want people to feel at ease and like they're looked after.

I'm going to talk to my mum about it and start working on this for real - I've had the idea bouncing around for a year or so now, but have always worried about how it would reflect on me in regards to my odd aesthetic choices, when really it's not about that. I have some perfect ideas for opening a place - either right on the street where I work, which is a very nice area, or somewhere similar closer to the town. We'll see how it goes - it's bound to be a fun adventure :P

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Ryuki, British Milk Tea is not the same as this Milk/Bubble Tea - you have to try it to understand the difference :/ Just like how British Milk Tea is not the same as Indian Milk Tea/Chai. The main difference is in the preparation.

Also, it's not fair to say that only the British are creatures of habit - everyone is, which is why you need a USP to capture their interest. Don't underestimate people's capacity to try new things - sure there'll be naysayers, but I think despite people's tendency to be rigid, there are more people looking for something to spark their imagination - to add zest in an otherwise grey world.

i'm sure you realise that telling me that i have to understand the difference, does not magically make me understand. if i don't see what the difference is, then you telling me i have to understand is not going to do it, it just sounds like an attack.

I understand there is a difference. most people won't. they listen to a few words and then make up their mind. upon hearing 'milk tea' they will have already decided what it is and ignore the rest.

plus, the description i have been given, sounds very much like milkshake to me.

trust me, if there was somewhere close to me that did it, I would have already tried it.

and it is fair to say british people are people of habit. since i am british and lived here my entire life.

I'm pretty sure i remember you saying you grew up somewhere else, or spent a great deal of time elsewhere. your sphere of influence is not a traditional british background. you see society from a different perspective to how I do. I live within a british family who have lived in britain all their lives and among this society.

I frequent cafe's and i watch what people choose. they almost always choose exactly the same thing and are no inclined to try something new. they kick up a fuss any time anything is changed.

some people, I have merely suggested that they try something new and ended up in an argument.

I am very much interested in hearing about your perspective on things, but please don't attack my post in such a way. i don't feel it is very fair.

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Am I correct to pressume that tea in the UK is consumed hot? Milk tea is consumed cold. Do pardon my advocacy for Milk Tea. I really do enjoy the occasional drink with its rich and aromatic flavors, and would like to share my new found habit. Perhaps should chance permit, you might want to partake in trying it.

if i can find out exactly how to make it, I can advocate it in a place I know.

I am pretty friendly with the owners of a local shop that is a specialist in tea and coffee.

they may be interested in this as a way to drive up business as most small businesses need.

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Ryuki, British Milk Tea is not the same as this Milk/Bubble Tea - you have to try it to understand the difference :/ Just like how British Milk Tea is not the same as Indian Milk Tea/Chai. The main difference is in the preparation.

Also, it's not fair to say that only the British are creatures of habit - everyone is, which is why you need a USP to capture their interest. Don't underestimate people's capacity to try new things - sure there'll be naysayers, but I think despite people's tendency to be rigid, there are more people looking for something to spark their imagination - to add zest in an otherwise grey world.

i'm sure you realise that telling me that i have to understand the difference, does not magically make me understand. if i don't see what the difference is, then you telling me i have to understand is not going to do it, it just sounds like an attack.

I understand there is a difference. most people won't. they listen to a few words and then make up their mind. upon hearing 'milk tea' they will have already decided what it is and ignore the rest.

plus, the description i have been given, sounds very much like milkshake to me.

trust me, if there was somewhere close to me that did it, I would have already tried it.

and it is fair to say british people are people of habit. since i am british and lived here my entire life.

I'm pretty sure i remember you saying you grew up somewhere else, or spent a great deal of time elsewhere. your sphere of influence is not a traditional british background. you see society from a different perspective to how I do. I live within a british family who have lived in britain all their lives and among this society.

I frequent cafe's and i watch what people choose. they almost always choose exactly the same thing and are no inclined to try something new. they kick up a fuss any time anything is changed.

some people, I have merely suggested that they try something new and ended up in an argument.

I am very much interested in hearing about your perspective on things, but please don't attack my post in such a way. i don't feel it is very fair.

Wow, I did not mean for it to come off as an attack - my tone of writing was in no way aggrssive.

I didn't say that you simply had to understand the difference - I said you had to try it to understand the difference - something which I know you haven't done. I was merely advocating the idea that if the opportunity arose, that you should try it. I wasn't attacking you at all, just reinforcing the idea that you should give it a go, which I'm sure you will since Durendal likes to sing its praises :P

As for where I grew up...I was born and raised in the UK, the only considerable time I spent away was at most 3 months in Fiji when I was really young, like 8 or 9 years old, so I kind of still consider myself to be British born and bred, just (as you said) with a different perspective on society. I too like my habits - I walk into a shop, choose a dish/drink I'm familiar with and like the taste of, but I often do that after having tried whatever else interests me on the menu. Apart from that, I'm always open to new culinary experiences, provided they're safe for me to consume.

I know the majority of people probably don't have as flexible/curious a palate as I do, but when you said that all British people are creatures of habit it kind of felt like to me that you were attacking my idea of opening up a Tea House one day - telling me not to even bother because, due to habit, it wouldn't even get off the ground because it's not what people are used to. People aren't used to Japanese Food and there's plenty of restaurants in the area.

I think mainly, our views of people are evidently based on our different experiences - all my life I've seen people stick to habit, and I've seen those same people be a little adventurous. Of course, you'll regret some choices when the food isn't as good as you thought it would be, but if you like your dish (or don't) you're inclined to try something else that's different on the menu hoping it'll taste just as good or better :/

I'm sorry that you took my comment negatively, but I wasn't attacking you.

Going back to the tea, I'm keen on making my own at home - it'll probably be the only way my brother can try it without me dragging him off to China Town XD Also, I like the idea of making one with fresh fruit.

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ah....

big apologies. yeah i definitely owe you a big apology. I completely missed one word. one very important word.

I read your sentence as "- you have to try to understand the difference :/" completely missing the 'it'.

i misread it, didn't like how it sounded, and decided not to reread the sentence to make sure i hadn't got it wrong.

totally my fault.

sorry about that.

and also sorry i gave you the impression that i was knocking your idea. I wasn't.

I was replying solely to durendal at that point, although considering how I phrased it and the inference on what you had already proposed, I realise you have every right to take umbrage with it.

I guess i can elaborate by saying that my observations are based on my family and the regulars to cafes that i frequent.

in the city, everything is different.

I would like to try it.

I'd like to try and make it.

I mentioned it to the shopkeeper in the local tea/coffee store that i mentioned. she said she hadn't heard of it but would certainly be interested in learning more.

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Worry no more. Thanks to the information highway, here are a few easy steps in making your own milk or bubble tea.

Boil black tea leave, the longer you boil, the richer the taste would be. Be sure to drain it properly. Don't want you to be sipping leaves.

Mix cold condensed milk to the tea. (although you can add hot, my preference is cold)

Add sugar to sweeten.

Add syrup of desired flavor (can be almond, vanilla, chocolate or anything you want. Limited only to your imagination)

Option for you to add tapioca pearls or pudding (or even red beans, Lime jelly or black bricks)

And viola, you have your very own milk tea.

Of course you'll have to figure out the amount of each ingredient for yourself since it will vary depending on your preference.

I'm guessing that it would be 1 part tea and 2 parts milk. But don't take my word for it.

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ok thanks durendal.

so.. boiling the tea... won't it end up stewed?

I was always taught that stewed tea is bad.

and then.. condensed milk, is also got a taboo status in my family. it seems 'cheap'.

would cream be appropriate? or is it definitely condensed?

how much sugar is appropriate? i drink tea with two sugars normally.

would this be correct? or is it meant to be a lot sweeter?

and the viola. they are usually too big for cups, so could i use a miniature one? or must i crush it up into sawdust?

heh heh, sorry i couldn't resist. :mrgreen::badgrin: what a delicious little typo.

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Okay, I don't think I said anything about putting the viola in the drink.did I? :lol: Right back at yah. :mrgreen:

As for "stewed" tea, I'm not entirely sure. There are two things you can do for it. It's either you risk doing the same process where there will be two outcomes, or adopt your prefered way of preparing tea.

As for condensed milk, I'm not sure how cream will affect the taste. Pardon me for saying this, but such treatment to milk may be considered snubbish to others. Not sure about the ingredients over there, but cream is too rich and doesn't have the right flavor. Cream being rich is probably the reason why condensed looks cheap. :lol:

As for the sugar, it will depend on how much your sweet tooth can handle. I prefer mine to be very sweet. There are establishments that allow you to choose your sugar level, but generally, this drink is sweet.

The key here is to experiment. There are processes that we think is not acceptable only to find out that it's the exact opposite of what we expected. Like I mentioned, this information comes from the information highway (internet), so I really can't confirm any of it as I have never actually done it. Hmm... perhaps this is a good time to try making one myself.

This is actually the beauty of milk tea, it's inexpensive to prepare but still give out a soothing taste, and when you sell it, you can charge a lot. A standard milk tea over here, the good one, sells for around $2 for a large drink.

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No hard feelings Ryuki :)

That recipe is an interesting one - I found another way of making it that involves shaking to create the namesake of bubbles. The recipe I found also suggested the use of other milk alternatives to condensed milk (well, it uses Creamer and you can use anything as a substitute as it's down to your preference) so you can use Milk or Cream. As for the sweetening, you can use sugar but it recommended to use a Syrup made up of a mixture of white and brown sugar...though you can again substitute something else with a similar consistency - I plan to use Agave Nectar.

Here are the methods if you want to look at it:

Method One

Method Two

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As for condensed milk, I'm not sure how cream will affect the taste. Pardon me for saying this, but such treatment to milk may be considered snubbish to others.

if you went to school in the uk through the late 80's and early 90s you'd understand.

I hadn't considered this so maybe it would have been better had i not said that.

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I've bought all the ingredients necessary to make Milk Tea (with the exception of tapioca pearls, as I don't like them). I'll test it out tonight to see how my concoction would fare against the leading milk tea out there.

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yeah let me know.

I made some yesterday.

wasn't impressed.

i bought some evaporated milk and the end product simply tasted like evaporated milk.

maybe i made it wrong.

or perhaps it would simply be better with regular full fat milk.

or even semi skimmed. after all, this is looking to be rather unhealthy drink ^^;

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Oh hey! I managed to prepare the milk tea like I said and here are my findings.

It's not necessary to use condensed milk. Based on my taste test, it's the tea that gives the aroma and the milk that gives the taste. So the better tea you use, the better the aroma, this goes the same for the milk. I was informed that instead of condensed milk, other people use coffee mate. So your option to use cream may be more preferable than using condensed milk.

Also, my mixture consists of 2 parts tea and one part milk. This may vary depending on the consistency that you prefer. You can add more parts tea if you want to have a stronger tea aroma, as usually, the flavoring and milk may overcome the aroma of the tea.

Analyzing it further, the only difference that milk tea is to your regular tea drink is the addition of flavoring like vanilla or almond syrup and the sinkers (tapioca pearls, pudding or coconut gel etc.). It's the consistency of the drink that differentiates this from tea with milk.

I think I'm going to make this a regular nightly drink.

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ok cool, thanks durendal.

so it's pretty much like my tea, with a bit more milk and extra flavouring. I have some vanilla extract so i can do that easily.

oh well, the use of cream instead of milk, makes a bigger difference.

judging by that, I'm not sure if the market is here for this to be a special.

since very many british have their tea with up to a third milk or more, theres nothing really unique about it apart from the extra flavouring.

I would imagine that this is a marketable product in china and other asian countries because of the tendency to drink green teas and other tea without milk.

actually, it could be marketable as a specific method of preparation.

when we order tea, we usually get a jug with a little bit of milk in it. but it's not usually a lot.

and it's usually hot.

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I have to say, even though information on how to make milk tea is available, it's still not the same as the one being served in our local bar. The consistency is somehow different as well as the taste. I can't figure out how they managed to do that. Like I said, I know what tea with lots of milk tastes like, and the milk tea I made tastes exactly like that. But the milk tea I buy from outside tastes different. I guess that's probably the reason why so many people are buying from them, it's because it's difficult to imitate their formula.

Additionally, I'm drinking Roasted Milk Tea from another establishment right now. The taste of the tea is very prominent but having the consistency of something like diluted milk. Very tasty, with Adzuki beans and pudding as sinkers.

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so it's a secret recipe. :)

i'll have to try it some time if i can ever get access to it.

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Oh hey, since I have a lot of condensed milk left over, I had been experimenting with a lot of flavors in preparing milk tea. Last night I hit the jackpot and managed to concoct a very tasty drink. It was the usual black tea and milk. But instead of adding the usual flavoring, I decided to try to add some Ghirardelli chocolate power. Around a teaspoon full. I was surprised that it tasted different. The aroma of the tea remains with a hint of chocolate.

The only difficulty with this is that Ghirardelli chocolate is expensive.

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